Health promotion and chronic disease prevention in Canada : research, policy and practice | 2019

Age at first alcohol use predicts current alcohol use, binge drinking and mixing of alcohol with energy drinks among Ontario Grade 12 students in the COMPASS study.

 
 
 
 
 

Abstract


INTRODUCTION\nThis study investigates the influence of age at first use of alcohol on current alcohol use and associated behaviours in a large sample of Canadian youth.\n\n\nMETHODS\nThis descriptive-analytical study was conducted among Ontario Grade 12 students enrolled in the COMPASS Host Study between 2012 and 2017. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) modelling to determine associations between age at first alcohol use and likelihood of current versus non-current alcohol use, binge drinking and mixing of alcohol with energy drinks among respondents.\n\n\nRESULTS\nStudents reporting an age at first alcohol use between ages 13 and 14 years were more likely to report current alcohol use versus non-current use (OR = 2.80, 95% CI: 2.26-3.45) and current binge drinking versus non-current binge drinking (OR = 3.22, 95% CI: 2.45-4.25) compared to students reporting first alcohol use at age 18 years or older. Students who started drinking at 8 years of age or younger were more likely to report current versus non-current alcohol use (OR = 3.54, 95% CI: 2.83-4.43), binge drinking (OR = 3.99, 95% CI: 2.97-5.37), and mixing of alcohol with energy drinks (OR = 2.26, 95% CI: 1.23-4.14), compared to students who started drinking at 18 years or older.\n\n\nCONCLUSION\nStarting to drink alcohol in the early teen years predicted current alcohol use, current binge drinking and mixing of alcohol with energy drinks when students were in Grade 12. Findings indicate a need for development of novel alcohol prevention efforts.

Volume 39 11
Pages \n 298-305\n
DOI 10.24095/hpcdp.39.11.02
Language English
Journal Health promotion and chronic disease prevention in Canada : research, policy and practice

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