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Dive into the research topics where Cécile Laroche is active.

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Featured researches published by Cécile Laroche.


Europace | 2014

A prospective survey in European Society of Cardiology member countries of atrial fibrillation management: baseline results of EURObservational Research Programme Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot General Registry

Gregory Y.H. Lip; Cécile Laroche; Gheorghe-Andrei Dan; Massimo Santini; Zbigniew Kalarus; Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen; M. Oliveira; Georges H. Mairesse; Harry J.G.M. Crijns; Emmanouil Simantirakis; Dan Atar; Paulus Kirchhof; Panos E. Vardas; Luigi Tavazzi; Aldo P. Maggioni

AIMS Given the advances in atrial fibrillation (AF) management and the availability of new European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines, there is a need for the systematic collection of contemporary data regarding the management and treatment of AF in ESC member countries. METHODS AND RESULTS We conducted a registry of consecutive in- and outpatients with AF presenting to cardiologists in nine participating ESC countries. All patients with an ECG-documented diagnosis of AF confirmed in the year prior to enrolment were eligible. We enroled a total of 3119 patients from February 2012 to March 2013, with full data on clinical subtype available for 3049 patients (40.4% female; mean age 68.8 years). Common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary disease, and heart failure. Lone AF was present in only 3.9% (122 patients). Asymptomatic AF was common, particularly among those with permanent AF. Amiodarone was the most common antiarrhythmic agent used (∼20%), while beta-blockers and digoxin were the most used rate control drugs. Oral anticoagulants (OACs) were used in 80% overall, most often vitamin K antagonists (71.6%), with novel OACs being used in 8.4%. Other antithrombotics (mostly antiplatelet therapy, especially aspirin) were still used in one-third of the patients, and no antithrombotic treatment in only 4.8%. Oral anticoagulants were used in 56.4% of CHA2DS2-VASc = 0, with 26.3% having no antithrombotic therapy. A high HAS-BLED score was not used to exclude OAC use, but there was a trend towards more aspirin use in the presence of a high HAS-BLED score. CONCLUSION The EURObservational Research Programme Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot Registry has provided systematic collection of contemporary data regarding the management and treatment of AF by cardiologists in ESC member countries. Oral anticoagulant use has increased, but novel OAC use was still low. Compliance with the treatment guidelines for patients with the lowest and higher stroke risk scores remains suboptimal.


European Journal of Heart Failure | 2014

Co-morbidities in patients with heart failure: an analysis of the European Heart Failure Pilot Survey

Vincent M. van Deursen; Renato Urso; Cécile Laroche; Kevin Damman; Ulf Dahlström; Luigi Tavazzi; Aldo P. Maggioni; Adriaan A. Voors

Co‐morbidities frequently accompany heart failure (HF), contributing to increased morbidity and mortality, and an impairment of quality of life. We assessed the prevalence, determinants, regional variation, and prognostic implications of co‐morbidities in patients with chronic HF in Europe.


European Heart Journal | 2014

Prognosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation patients by European cardiologists: One Year Follow-up of the EURObservational Research Programme-Atrial Fibrillation General Registry Pilot Phase (EORP-AF Pilot registry)

Gregory Y.H. Lip; Cécile Laroche; Popescu Mircea Ioachim; Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen; Laura Vitali-Serdoz; Lucian Petrescu; Dan Darabantiu; Harry J.G.M. Crijns; Paulus Kirchhof; Panos E. Vardas; Luigi Tavazzi; Aldo P. Maggioni; Giuseppe Boriani

BACKGROUND The EURObservational Research Programme-Atrial Fibrillation General Registry Pilot Phase (EORP-AF Pilot) provides systematic collection of contemporary data regarding the management and treatment of 3119 subjects with AF from 9 member European Society of Cardiology (ESC) countries. In this analysis, we report the development of symptoms, use of antithrombotic therapy and rate vs. rhythm strategies, as well as determinants of mortality and/or stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA)/peripheral embolism during 1-year follow-up in this contemporary European registry of AF patients. METHODS The registry population comprised consecutive in- and out-patients with AF presenting to cardiologists in participating ESC countries. Consecutive patients with AF documented by ECG were enrolled. Follow-up was performed by the local investigator, initially at 1 year, as part of a long-term cohort study. RESULTS At the follow-up, patients were frequently asymptomatic (76.8%), but symptoms are nevertheless common among paroxysmal and persistent AF patients, especially palpitations, fatigue, and shortness of breath. Oral anticoagulant (OAC) use remains high, ∼78% overall at follow-up, and of those on vitamin K antagonist (VKA), 84% remained on VKA during the follow-up, while of those on non-VKA oral anticoagulant (NOAC) at baseline, 86% remained on NOAC, and 11.8% had changed to a VKA and 1.1% to antiplatelet therapy. Digitalis was commonly used in paroxysmal AF patients. Of rhythm control interventions, electrical cardioversion was performed in 9.7%, pharmacological cardioversion in 5.1%, and catheter ablation in 4.4%. Despite good adherence to anticoagulation, 1-year mortality was high (5.7%), with most deaths were cardiovascular (70%). Hospital readmissions were common, especially for atrial tachyarrhythmias and heart failure. On multivariate analysis, independent baseline predictors for mortality and/or stroke/TIA/peripheral embolism were age, AF as primary presentation, previous TIA, chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, malignancy, and minor bleeding. Independent predictors of mortality were age, chronic kidney disease, AF as primary presentation, prior TIA, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malignancy, minor bleeding, and diuretic use. Statin use was predictive of lower mortality. CONCLUSION In this 1-year follow-up analysis of the EORP-AF pilot general registry, we provide data on the first contemporary registry focused on management practices among European cardiologists, conducted since the publication of the new ESC guidelines. Overall OAC use remains high, although persistence with therapy may be problematic. Nonetheless, continued OAC use was more common than in prior reports. Despite the high prescription of OAC, 1-year mortality and morbidity remain high in AF patients, particularly from heart failure and hospitalizations.


European Journal of Heart Failure | 2016

European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Long-Term Registry (ESC-HF-LT): 1-year follow-up outcomes and differences across regions

María G. Crespo-Leiro; Stefan D. Anker; Aldo P. Maggioni; Andrew J.S. Coats; Gerasimos Filippatos; Frank Ruschitzka; Roberto Ferrari; Massimo F. Piepoli; Juan F. Delgado Jimenez; Marco Metra; Candida Fonseca; Jaromir Hradec; Offer Amir; Damien Logeart; Ulf Dahlström; Béla Merkely; Jarosław Drożdż; Eva Goncalvesova; Mahmoud Hassanein; Mitja Lainscak; Petar Seferovic; Dimitris Tousoulis; Ausra Kavoliuniene; Fruhwald Fm; Emir Fazlibegovic; Ahmet Temizhan; Plamen Gatzov; Andrejs Erglis; Cécile Laroche; Alexandre Mebazaa

The European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Long‐Term Registry (ESC‐HF‐LT‐R) was set up with the aim of describing the clinical epidemiology and the 1‐year outcomes of patients with heart failure (HF) with the added intention of comparing differences between participating countries.


The American Journal of Medicine | 2014

‘Real-World’ Antithrombotic Treatment in Atrial Fibrillation: The EORP-AF Pilot Survey

Gregory Y.H. Lip; Cécile Laroche; Gheorghe-Andrei Dan; Massimo Santini; Zbigniew Kalarus; Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen; Popescu Mircea Ioachim; Otilia Tica; Giuseppe Boriani; Paolo Cimaglia; Igor Diemberger; Camilla Fragtrup Hellum; Bettina Mortensen; Aldo P. Maggioni

BACKGROUND Current guidelines strongly recommend that oral anticoagulation should be offered to patients with atrial fibrillation and ≥1 stroke risk factors. The guidelines also recommend that oral anticoagulation still should be used in the presence of stroke risk factors irrespective of rate or rhythm control. METHODS In an analysis from the dataset of the EURObservational Research Programme on Atrial Fibrillation Pilot Survey (n = 3119), we examined antithrombotic therapy prescribing, with particular focus on the risk factors determining oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy use. RESULTS When oral anticoagulation was used among admitted patients in whom no pharmacologic cardioversion, electrical cardioversion, or catheter ablation was performed or planned, vitamin K antagonist therapy was prescribed in the majority (72.2%), whereas novel oral anticoagulants were used in the minority (7.7%). There was no significant difference in bleeding risk factors among the patients treated with the different types of antithrombotic therapies, except for those with chronic kidney disease, in whom oral anticoagulation was less commonly used (P = .0318). Antiplatelet therapy was more commonly used in patients with a high Hypertension, Abnormal renal/liver function, Stroke, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile international normalized ratio, Elderly (>65 years), Drugs/alcohol concomitantly score (≥2) (P < .0001). More oral anticoagulation use was associated with female gender (P = .0245). Less novel oral anticoagulant use was associated with valvular heart disease (P < .0001), chronic heart failure (P = .0010), coronary artery disease (P < .0001), and peripheral artery disease (P = .0092). Coronary artery disease was the strongest reason for combination therapy with oral anticoagulation plus antiplatelet drug (odds ratio, 8.54; P < .0001). When the Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 [Doubled], Diabetes, Stroke [Doubled]-Vascular disease, Age 65-74, and Sex category [female] score was used, 95.6% of patients with a score ≥1 received antithrombotic therapy, with 80.5% of patients with a score ≥1 receiving oral anticoagulation. Of note, 83.7% of those with a score ≥2 received antithrombotic therapy. Of the latter, 70.9% of those with a score ≥2 received oral anticoagulation, vitamin K antagonists were used in 64.1%, and novel oral anticoagulants were used in 6.9%. CONCLUSIONS The EURObservational Research Programme on Atrial Fibrillation Pilot Survey provides contemporary data on oral anticoagulation prescribing by European cardiologists for atrial fibrillation. Although the uptake of oral anticoagulation (mostly vitamin K antagonist therapy) has improved since the Euro Heart Survey a decade ago, antiplatelet therapy is still commonly prescribed, with or without oral anticoagulation, whereas elderly patients are commonly undertreated with oral anticoagulation.


European Heart Journal | 2014

The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study: an European Survey on Methodology and results of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association

Elena Arbelo; Josep Brugada; Gerhard Hindricks; Aldo P. Maggioni; Luigi Tavazzi; Panos E. Vardas; Cécile Laroche; Frederic Anselme; Giuseppe Inama; Pierre Jaïs; Zbigniew Kalarus; Josef Kautzner; Thorsten Lewalter; Georges H. Mairesse; Julián Pérez-Villacastín; Sam Riahi; Milos Taborsky; George N. Theodorakis; Serge A. Trines

AIMS The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse how centres assess in routine clinical practice the success of the procedure and to evaluate the success rate and long-term safety/complications. METHODS AND RESULTS Seventy-two centres in 10 European countries were asked to enrol 20 consecutive patients undergoing a first AFib ablation procedure. A web-based case report form captured information on pre-procedural, procedural, and 1-year follow-up data. Between October 2010 and May 2011, 1410 patients were included and 1391 underwent an AFib ablation (98.7%). A total of 1300 patients (93.5%) completed a follow-up control 367 ± 42 days after the procedure. Arrhythmia documentation was done by an electrocardiogram in 76%, Holter-monitoring in 52%, transtelephonic monitoring in 8%, and/or implanted systems in 4.5%. Over 50% became asymptomatic. Twenty-one per cent were re-admitted due to post-ablation arrhythmias. Success without antiarrhythmic drugs was achieved in 40.7% of patients (43.7% in paroxysmal AF; 30.2% in persistent AF; 36.7% in long-lasting persistent AF). A second ablation was required in 18% of the cases and 43.4% were under antiarrhythmic treatment. Thirty-three patients (2.5%) suffered an adverse event, 272 (21%) experienced a left atrial tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter ablation of AFib in a real-world setting. The methods used to assess the success of the procedure appeared at least suboptimal. Even in this context, the 12-month success rate appears to be somewhat lower to the one reported clinical trials.


The American Journal of Medicine | 2015

Asymptomatic Atrial Fibrillation: Clinical Correlates, Management, and Outcomes in the EORP-AF Pilot General Registry

Giuseppe Boriani; Cécile Laroche; Igor Diemberger; Elisa Fantecchi; Mircea Ioachim Popescu; Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen; Gianfranco Sinagra; Lucian Petrescu; Luigi Tavazzi; Aldo P. Maggioni; Gregory Y.H. Lip

OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation is often asymptomatic, but outcomes require further characterization. The study objective was to investigate the clinical presentation, management, and outcomes in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with atrial fibrillation who were prospectively enrolled in the EurObservational Research Programme - Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot General Registry. METHODS A total of 3119 patients were enrolled, and 1237 (39.7%) were asymptomatic (European Heart Rhythm Association [EHRA] score I). Among symptomatic patients, 963 (51.2%) had mild symptoms (EHRA score II) and 919 (48.8%) had severe or disabling symptoms (EHRA III-IV). Permanent atrial fibrillation was 3-fold more common in asymptomatic patients than in symptomatic patients. RESULTS On multivariate analysis, male gender (odds ratio [OR], 1.630; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.384-1.921), older age (OR, 1.019; 95% CI, 1.012-1.026), previous myocardial infarction (OR, 1.681; 95% CI, 1.350-2.093), and limited physical activity (OR, 1.757; 95% CI, 1.495-2.064) were associated significantly with asymptomatic (EHRA I) atrial fibrillation. Fully asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (absence of current and previous symptoms) was present in 520 patients (16.7%) and was associated independently with male gender, age, and previous myocardial infarction. Appropriate guideline-based prescription of oral anticoagulants was lower in these patients, and aspirin was prescribed more frequently. Mortality at 1 year was more than 2-fold higher in asymptomatic patients compared with symptomatic patients (9.4% vs 4.2%, P < .0001) and was associated independently with older age and comorbidities, including chronic kidney disease and chronic heart failure. CONCLUSIONS Asymptomatic atrial fibrillation is common in daily cardiology practice and is associated with elderly age, more comorbidities, and high thromboembolic risks. A higher 1-year mortality was found in asymptomatic patients compared with symptomatic patients.


European Journal of Heart Failure | 2017

Epidemiology and one-year outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure and preserved, mid-range and reduced ejection fraction: an analysis of the ESC Heart Failure Long-Term Registry

Mitja Lainscak; Petar Seferovic; Stefan D. Anker; María G. Crespo-Leiro; Veli-Pekka Harjola; John Parissis; Cécile Laroche; Massimo F. Piepoli; Candida Fonseca; Alexandre Mebazaa; Lars H. Lund; Giuseppe Ambrosio; Andrew J.S. Coats; Roberto Ferrari; Frank Ruschitzka; Aldo P. Maggioni; Gerasimos Filippatos

The objectives of the present study were to describe epidemiology and outcomes in ambulatory heart failure (HF) patients stratified by left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and to identify predictors for mortality at 1 year in each group.


Europace | 2015

Sex-related differences in presentation, treatment, and outcome of patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe: a report from the Euro Observational Research Programme Pilot survey on Atrial Fibrillation

Gregory Y.H. Lip; Cécile Laroche; Giuseppe Boriani; Paolo Cimaglia; Gheorghe-Andrei Dan; Massimo Santini; Zbigniew Kalarus; Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen; Mircea Ioachim Popescu; Otilia Tica; Camilla Fragtrup Hellum; Bettina Mortensen; Luigi Tavazzi; Aldo P. Maggioni

AIMS Sex differences in the epidemiology and clinical management of AF are evident. Of note, females are more symptomatic and if age >65, are at higher risk of thromboembolism if incident AF develops, compared with males. METHODS AND RESULTS In an analysis from the dataset of the Euro Observational Research Programme on Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot survey (n = 3119), we examined sex-related differences in presentation, treatment, and outcome of contemporary patients with AF in Europe.Female subjects were older (P < 0.0001), with a greater proportion aged ≥75 years, with more heart failure and hypertension. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction was more common in females (P < 0.0001), as was valvular heart disease (P = 0.0003). Females were more symptomatic compared with males with a higher proportion being EHRA Class III and IV (P = 0.0012). The more common symptoms that were more prevalent in females were palpitations (P < 0.0001) and fear/anxiety (P = 0.0007). Other symptoms (e.g. dyspnoea, chest pain, fatigue, etc.) were not different between males and females. Health status scores were significantly lower for females overall, specifically for the psychological and physical domains (both P < 0.0001) but not for the sexual activity domain (P = 0.9023). Females were less likely to have electrical cardioversion (18.9 vs. 25.5%, P < 0.0001), and more likely to receive rate control (P = 0.002). Among patients recruited in hospital and discharged alive (n = 2009), documented contraindications to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) were evident in 23.8% of females. A CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 was found in 94.7% of females and 74.6% of males (P < 0.0001), with oral anticoagulants being used in 95.3 and 76.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). A HAS-BLED score of ≥3 was found in 12.2% of females and 14.5% of males. Independent predictors of VKA use in females on multivariate analysis were CHA2DS2-VASc score (P = 0.0007), lower HAS-BLED score (P = 0.0284), and prosthetic mechanical valves (P = 0.0276). CONCLUSION The EORP-AF Pilot survey provides contemporary data on sex differences in clinical features and management of AF patients participating in the EORP-AF Pilot registry. Female subjects were older and more symptomatic, compared with males, and were more likely to receive rate control. Also, female patients were at higher stroke risk overall, but oral anticoagulation was used in a high proportion of patients.


European Journal of Heart Failure | 2015

Heart failure in patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe: A report from the EURObservational Research Programme Pilot survey on Atrial Fibrillation

Gregory Y.H. Lip; Cécile Laroche; Mircea Ioachim Popescu; Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen; Laura Vitali-Serdoz; Gheorghe-Andrei Dan; Zbigniew Kalarus; Harry J.G.M. Crijns; M. Oliveira; Luigi Tavazzi; Aldo P. Maggioni; Giuseppe Boriani

The purpose of this study was too describe the associated baseline features of AF patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced and preserved ejection fraction (HFrEF and HFpEF). Secondly, we assessed symptomatic status and their clinical correlates. Finally, we examined independent predictors for ‘heart failure’ at the 1‐year follow‐up period.

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Giuseppe Boriani

University of Modena and Reggio Emilia

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Marco Proietti

University of Birmingham

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Gheorghe-Andrei Dan

Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy

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Zbigniew Kalarus

Medical University of Silesia

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